Queen Snapper

Queen Snapper

Scientific Name

Etelis oculatus

Common Name

Ballbat

Stock Status

Overfishing – No

Overfished – Unknown

Stock Assessment

SEDAR 26

Regulations

Recreational Commercial
Season Open year-round. If landings reach the stock complex ACL, harvest will be prohibited for the remainder of the fishing year. Season Open year-round. If landings reach the stock complex ACL, harvest will be prohibited for the remainder of the fishing year.
Minimum Size Limit none Minimum Size Limit none
Bag Limit Within the 10-snapper aggregate bag limit which includes gray, mutton, yellowtail, cubera, queen, blackfin, wenchman, and silk snappers. Trip Limit none
Permit State issued recreational license/angler registry, federal angler registry or Federal charter/headboat permit for reef fish Permit Commercial vessel permit for reef fish is required.
Gear Non-stainless steel circle hooks are required when fishing with natural baits. At least one dehooking device is required and must be used to remove hooks. Gear Non-stainless steel circle hooks are required when fishing with natural baits. At least one dehooking device is required and must be used to remove hooks.

Harvest Limits

Sector Annual Catch Limit
Stock   Complex ACL for silk, queen, blackfin, and wenchman snapper – 166,000 pounds

Description

Queen snapper is distributed in continental shelf waters throughout the western Atlantic as far east as Bermuda, and from North Carolina south through eastern Brazil.  It is a dark red to pinkish red above its midline with a long, slender body.  The dorsal fin is spiny with a deep notch in the middle.  The tail fin is deeply forked.

 

Maximum observed age:  10 years1

Age at maturity: 1 – 2 years2

Maximum weight:  28 pounds (12.70 kilograms)3

Maximum length:  39.40 inches (100.07 centimeters)4

Life History and Distribution

Queen snapper is found deeper than other snapper species in the western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.  It appears to inhabit depths between 328 – 1640 feet (100 – 500 meters) based on angler observation.  Little scientific information exists on the life history characteristics of queen snapper compared to other snappers.  It reproduces throughout the year but, peak spawning is in October and November.5

References

  1. SEDAR 26 Caribbean Queen Snapper Final Stock Assessment Report, December 2011
  2. Bryan, M.D., del Mar Lopez, M., and Tokotch, B. (2011), A review of the life history characteristics of silk snapper, queen snapper, and redtail parrotfish. SEDAR26-DW-01.
  3. IGFA All Tackle Record, Long Key, Florida
  4. Cervigón, F., 1993. Los peces marinos de Venezuela. Volume 2. Fundación Científica Los Roques, Caracas,Venezuela. 497 p.
  5. SEDAR 26 Caribbean Queen Snapper Final Stock Assessment Report, December 2011